The blog contains society news and activities. You are welcome to comment on the pages. Find the main website of the society at: www.tottonartsociety.org.uk To contact the society directly please email: editor@tottonartsociety.org.uk

Friday, September 27, 2019

Adventurous Artists

Meet at Nomansland on Friday 11th October at 10-15 am on the cricket green. If raining meet in The Lamb which opens at 11am.

Fiona's Paintings

These are pictures of Fiona's paintings - one of the finished picture to follow.





Demonstration evening




At the beginning of the evening Mary was presented with her certificate for the Reg Whiting Trophy (won jointly with Di)  and Fred was presented with his cup and certificate for his Silver Award for the Best Picture by public vote (Lesley won the Gold). More details on the website.



The evening continued with:-

FIONA FORBES DEMONSTRATING PAINTING FLOWERS WITH KNIVES 

Fiona painted with watercolours until 25 years ago when she was told to try knives. They have the advantage that they are easy to clean!

She uses mainly a medium sized knife with a small one for detail. Tonight's painting was done on MDF board primed with two coats of white gesso and a coat of acrylic and then the under painting added with water-based oil. A disposable palette is used for the paints which are mixed with a palette knife. Impasto medium is added for texture and to quicken the drying time.

Tonight's background colour was blue made of magenta and mauve with green from various yellows and blues.

Fiona began with the paler flowers using cadmium red, Naples yellow and white  as the basic colour. Using a small knife she started with the background petals. The knife is well loaded to help produce an impasto effect and a small amount of dark colour put on the knife tip for adding detail. Foreground flowers painted later had more texture helped by using some impasto paste.  Fiona suggested that it is best to be open-minded about the colour and be ready to change the colours when working through the painting.

Shadow colour used especially for red roses is mauve and blue blended with white. Dioxine purple, alizarin and cadmium red make good dark colours for the centre of flowers. 

Leaf colours are obtained by mixing either turquoise and orange or a combination of lemon yellow, cadmium yellow, yellow ochre, or raw sienna mixed with any blue. She also uses olive green with white to produce a dark green which is very effective against a light coloured flower. Touches of light green or even white are used to give highlights. 

Fiona paints quickly to get an impressionist effect working over the whole area of the painting. She is very careful putting more paint over wet paint as the lower layer can be dislodged. Make sure the knife is clean! She likes to pause for a few days to re-assess the picture then adding more detail and shadows.

We look forward to seeing the completed painting and thank Fiona for an excellent and inspiring evening.

FIONA FORBES DEMONSTRATES PAINTING FLOWERS WITH KNIVES

 

Fiona painted with watercolours until 25 years ago when she was told to try knives. They have the advantage that they are easy to clean!

She uses mainly a medium sized knife with a small one for detail. Tonight's painting was done on MDF board primed with two coats of white gesso and a coat of acrylic and then the under painting added with water-based oil. A disposable palette is used for the paints which are mixed with a palette knife. Impasto medium is added for texture and to quicken the drying time.

Tonight's background colour was blue made of magenta and mauve with green from various yellows and blues.

Fiona began with the paler flowers using cadmium red, Naples yellow and white  as the basic colour. Using a small knife she started with the background petals. The knife is well loaded to help produce an impasto effect and a small amount of dark colour put on the knife tip for adding detail. Foreground flowers painted later had more texture helped by using some impasto paste.  Fiona suggested that it is best to be open-minded about the colour and be ready to change the colours when working through the painting.

Shadow colour used especially for red roses is mauve and blue blended with white. Dioxine purple, alizarin and cadmium red make good dark colours for the centre of flowers. 

Leaf colours are obtained by mixing either turquoise and orange or a combination of lemon yellow, cadmium yellow, yellow ochre, or raw sienna mixed with any blue. She also uses olive green with white to produce a dark green which is very effective against a light coloured flower. Touches of light green or even white are used to give highlights. 

Fiona paints quickly to get an impressionist effect working over the whole area of the painting. She is very careful putting more paint over wet paint as the lower layer can be dislodged. Make sure the knife is clean! She likes to pause for a few days to re-assess the picture then adding more detail and shadows.

We look forward to seeing the completed painting and thank Fiona for an excellent and inspiring evening.

Friday, September 13, 2019

Mortimer Arms

ADVENTUROUS ARTISTS at the MORTIMER ARMS

Spent a lovely morning in the garden sitting in the sun, sketching, drinking coffee, chatting...........

 Here are a few sketches :-



Monday, September 9, 2019

SEPTEMBER EVENTS

FRIDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER  ADVENTUROUS ARTISTS
10.15  at the Mortimer Arms, Romsey Rd, Ower, SO51 6AF. Take the turning to Paulton’s Park and it is on the right- hand side   
                                                                                                      


TUESDAY 17th AUGUST ART EXTRA AFTERNOON



in the Lilac room Civic Centre 1-30 to 3-30pm 


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 25TH DEMONSTRATION EVENING
Fiona Forbes will show us how she paints a vase of flowers with knives


Members Evening

MEMBERS EVENING WITH DI AND HELEN

Di and Helen had obviously worked hard to produce an evening on which we examined perspective.
Helen started by showing us ways to deal with perspective involving distance and looking at a spherical or flat circular object from different angles and examining how it can be viewed as an ellipse. Di then continued with a demonstration of how perspective depends on viewpoints and vanishing points and how it changes. We then tried out the theories on different subjects from pictures supplied by Di and Helen. It was a very interesting evening and certainly made us think carefully about how we represent structures particularly in landscapes and still life paintings.

We also had the pleasure of applauding Lesley for winning the 50th Anniversary Trophy for the Best painting in the exhibition - "Hoppy" and Fred for being voted the Best Runner Up with his painting of  "The Shrinking Waterhole" Excellent pictures from both of them!