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Monday, June 2, 2014


Robert Dudley Demonstration

 
Robert started the evening in a lively manner with anecdotes about his early career including his work on "Shaun the Sheep"

His first premise for any art work is that it is a visual communication between artist and viewer.

 The major part of a painting is the planning. This involves primarily observation and thinking of the content but also making sketches (about 12) and taking photographs (about 200) He will readily omit or move objects in a scene to achieve his aim of communicating what he feels about the painting. Light is an important factor especially with water as the subject.

He started his picture by using masking fluid to create sparkle on the sea. The mask is diluted and the brush dipped in a solution of warm water and detergent and then masking fluid each time it is used. Continual use produces a good splayed brush.

The next stage was the sky which was painted so that a light area was left in the centre with more washes in some areas

The sea followed using Ultramarine and Winsor Blue to produce horizontal streaks of colour. Areas around the masking fluid were darkened to emphasise the waves. The whole was carefully worked over and blended using a large brush. An atomiser produced streaks of colour to indicate reflections.

The distant headland was then painted using Permanent Rose and Ultramarine used pale in the distance and strong in the foreground. More detail was added with Green Gold and Burnt Sienna.

Finally, after putting in finishing touches and detail, a few yachts were placed to emphasise the focal point of the painting.

The final result was a beautiful picture which Robert has very kindly given as a raffle prize at our Annual Exhibition.  
Rob with the finished painting
 
Light on the sea
Another of Rob's paintings
 
 

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