The blog contains society news and activities. You are welcome to comment on the pages. Find the main website of the society at: www.tottonartsociety.org.uk To contact the society directly please email: editor@tottonartsociety.org.uk

Saturday, December 5, 2015


 

Teresa Rogers, our November guest artist, is extremely versatile, creating artwork not only in oils and other media, but also prints, collages, printed works, cards, coasters, fridge magnets and craftwork. 



Favourite techniques used by Teresa include collagraph or linocut prints using her own printing press. We saw one of her collagraphs -  a leaf shape cut from mount-board, scored with a scalpel, pieces of wallpaper stuck on top and the whole thing sealed with shellac button varnish. It would then have been inked with oil-based printing ink and pressed onto wet watercolour paper as many times as required.



Teresa showed us that layers of the mount-board peeled back create interesting textures. Other materials used for collagraphs include: dimpled polystyrene trays string, torn scrim or gauze, creased tissue paper, aluminium foil PVA glue which also acts as a resist - creating white shapes in the printed image. Teresa sometimes uses lace shapes as a background for wedding invitations.



The first demonstration piece was not a collagraph but a collage made with pieces of cut and torn wallpaper applied to mount-board with either matt acrylic medium or diluted PVA glue (which dries more slowly). They were then embellished with scrim, sequin waste, small stars and scraps of printed thin paper. Acrylic inks were applied for more tonal contrast. Daler Rowney Goldfinger Metallic Paste was rubbed onto some of the textured areas. (Silver Goldfinger is available in five colours) Teresa has boxes of sparkly materials to embellish her work.





 



 

Teresa Rogers, our November guest artist, is extremely versatile, creating artwork not only in oils and other media, but also prints, collages, printed works, cards, coasters, fridge magnets and craftwork. 



Favourite techniques used by Teresa include collagraph or linocut prints using her own printing press. We saw one of her collagraphs -  a leaf shape cut from mount-board, scored with a scalpel, pieces of wallpaper stuck on top and the whole thing sealed with shellac button varnish. It would then have been inked with oil-based printing ink and pressed onto wet watercolour paper as many times as required.



Teresa showed us that layers of the mount-board peeled back create interesting textures. Other materials used for collagraphs include: dimpled polystyrene trays string, torn scrim or gauze, creased tissue paper, aluminium foil PVA glue which also acts as a resist - creating white shapes in the printed image. Teresa sometimes uses lace shapes as a background for wedding invitations.



The first demonstration piece was not a collagraph but a collage made with pieces of cut and torn wallpaper applied to mount-board with either matt acrylic medium or diluted PVA glue (which dries more slowly). They were then embellished with scrim, sequin waste, small stars and scraps of printed thin paper. Acrylic inks were applied for more tonal contrast. Daler Rowney Goldfinger Metallic Paste was rubbed onto some of the textured areas. (Silver Goldfinger is available in five colours) Teresa has boxes of sparkly materials to embellish her work.





 





 

Teresa Rogers, our November guest artist, is extremely versatile, creating artwork not only in oils and other media, but also prints, collages, printed works, cards, coasters, fridge magnets and craftwork. 



Favourite techniques used by Teresa include collagraph or linocut prints using her own printing press. We saw one of her collagraphs -  a leaf shape cut from mount-board, scored with a scalpel, pieces of wallpaper stuck on top and the whole thing sealed with shellac button varnish. It would then have been inked with oil-based printing ink and pressed onto wet watercolour paper as many times as required.



Teresa showed us that layers of the mount-board peeled back create interesting textures. Other materials used for collagraphs include: dimpled polystyrene trays string, torn scrim or gauze, creased tissue paper, aluminium foil PVA glue which also acts as a resist - creating white shapes in the printed image. Teresa sometimes uses lace shapes as a background for wedding invitations.



The first demonstration piece was not a collagraph but a collage made with pieces of cut and torn wallpaper applied to mount-board with either matt acrylic medium or diluted PVA glue (which dries more slowly). They were then embellished with scrim, sequin waste, small stars and scraps of printed thin paper. Acrylic inks were applied for more tonal contrast. Daler Rowney Goldfinger Metallic Paste was rubbed onto some of the textured areas. (Silver Goldfinger is available in five colours) Teresa has boxes of sparkly materials to embellish her work.



 
Teresa’s second piece was an impressionist landscape, created with layers of paint and cut paper shapes. Paper pre-printed with fennel leaves made effective tree shapes in the foreground. Teresa enjoys using greens and blues in her work. She proposed to finish the work at home and varnish it with a layer of gloss acrylic medium or gloss varnish which would preserve the work and prevent the colours from fading.

There were questions about adapting Teresa’s techniques for those without access to a printing press. Teresa recommends scavenging wallpaper samples from DIY stores. Although it is not possible to create dark enough colours using water-based paints, Teresa suggested making coloured papers by crushing tissue paper onto glass coated with acrylic paints. Many natural materials, such as a cabbage leaf, will produce an interesting shape. We were all intrigued by Teresa’s very unusual artwork and members showed a keen interest in her displayed work.

Teresa’s studio gallery, where she also holds her art courses, are located at her Courtyard Studio in the Wilton Shopping Village three miles west of Salisbury (postcode SP2 0BH).
Teresa is pictured with one of her finished works.
 





No comments: